Nov 022017
 

Three short paragraphs:

QUESTION 1:  HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE FOR A NEW BORN’S LIVER TO MATURE?

ANSWER:   up to 2 years after birth

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15001122

U.S. National Library of Medicine

2003-10-08

Hepatic function and physiology in the newborn.

Abstract

The liver develops from progenitor cells into a well-differentiated organ in which bile secretion can be observed by 12 weeks’ gestation. Full maturity takes up to two years after birth to be achieved, and involves the normal expression of signalling pathways such as that responsible for the JAG1 genes (aberrations occur in Alagille’s syndrome), amino acid transport and insulin growth factors. At birth, hepatocytes are already specialized and have two surfaces: the sinusoidal side receives and absorbs a mixture of oxygenated blood and nutrients from the portal vein; the other surface delivers bile and other products of conjugation and metabolism (including drugs) to the canalicular network which joins up to the bile ductules. There is a rapid induction of functions such as transamination, glutamyl transferase, synthesis of coagulation factors, bile production and transport as soon as the umbilical supply is interrupted. Anatomical specialization can be observed across the hepatic acinus which has three distinct zones. Zone 1 borders the portal tracts (also known as periportal hepatocytes) and is noted for hepatocyte regeneration, bile duct proliferation and gluconeogenesis. Zone 3 borders the central vein and is associated with detoxification (e.g. paracetamol), aerobic metabolism, glycolysis and hydrolysis and zone 2 is an area of mixed function between the two zones. Preterm infants are at special risk of hepatic decompensation because their immaturity results in a delay in achieving normal detoxifying and synthetic function. Hypoxia and sepsis are also frequent and serious causes of liver dysfunction in neonates. Stem cell research has produced many answers to the questions about liver development and regeneration, and genetic studies including studies of susceptibility genes may yield further insights. The possibility that fatty liver (increasingly recognized as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH) may have roots in the neonatal period is a concept which may have important long-term implications.

PMID:
15001122
DOI:
10.1016/S1084-2756(03)00066-6
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QUESTION 2:  WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF A DAMAGED LIVER?

ANSWER: Know a bit about the function of the liver and you’ll grasp the significance of damaging it

from  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1534580710000559

(Skip the too-technical parts.)

The liver is the largest gland in the body exhibiting both endocrine and exocrine properties. Endocrine functions include the secretion of several hormones such as Insulin-like growth factors, Angiotensinogen, and Thrombopoietin, while the major exocrine secretion is in the form of bile.

The liver is also essential for glycogen storage, drug detoxification, control of metabolism, regulation of cholesterol synthesis and transport, urea metabolism, and secretion of an extensive array of plasma proteins including Albumin and Apolipoproteins.

Since the liver is such an important regulator of normal physiological processes, liver disease, such as hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, results in high rates of morbidity and mortality, so much so that liver disease is the fourth leading cause of death among middle-aged adults in the United States.

The high economical and health burden resulting from liver disease has prompted a call to increase understanding of the basic developmental mechanisms that control liver cell differentiation and function (Action Plan for Liver Disease Research: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/).

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QUESTION 3:  WHY DO THE AMERICANS ADMINISTER THE HEP B VACCINATION SHORTLY AFTER BIRTH?

ANSWER:  You decide.   Personally,  I have a large problem with the idea that you would inject a newborn with toxins when the liver is still in its infancy,

far from being fully developed.

(Hepatitus B is a sexually transmitted disease, also transmitted through needle exchange, or when body fluids from an infected person come into contact with another.  If mothers are drug users they would normally be tested for Hep B prior to the birth of their at-risk baby. (Hep B is like HIV.)

 

From the Centre for Disease Control,   https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/child/hepb.html

Doctors recommend that your child get 3 doses of the hepatitis B shot for best protection. Ask your doctor when your child should get the next shot. Typically, children get one dose at each of the following ages:

  • Shortly after birth
  • 1 through 2 months
  • 6 through 18 months

Your child may get a 4th dose depending on the brand of vaccines the doctor uses.

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We are dealing with Big Pharma,  transnationals.  What they get in one jurisdiction, they get in another.   Americans are fighting hard for CHOICE in vaccinations.   Canadians should be doing the same.

Note:

  • families of vaccine-injured children are not challenged by the Vaccine Injury Court if there is, for example, video evidence of a perfectly healthy toddler, who, within a day or few days of vaccination, regresses dramatically, developmentally.   Cause and effect cannot be denied, in the face of the evidence.
  • if newborns are vaccinated,  and injured, there is no evidence of developmental milestones with which to challenge the vaccinations.

Also note:  (U.S.)  a rationale provided for administering multiple vaccinations all at the same time comes down to,  a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.   You have the subject right there, in your office. Take advantage of the opportunity.  American pediatricians collect healthy incentives if they meet vaccination quotas.   See   How Much Money Do American Pediatricians Really Make From Vaccines?

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